Psalm 22:21-31 – Easter Sunday – Quotes from Calvin

Quotes from Calvin:

He does not pray in a doubting manner; but he promises himself the assistance which the eye of sense did not as yet perceive.

The cause is only put instead of the effect; for our deliverance is the consequence or effect of God’s hearing us. If it is asked how this can be applied to Christ, whom the Father did not deliver from death? I answer, in one word, that he was more mightily delivered than if God had prevented him from falling a victim to death, even as it is a much greater deliverance to rise again from the dead than to be healed of a grievous malady. Death, therefore, did not prevent Christ’s resurrection from at length bearing witness that he had been heard.

Vs. 22 => The second part of the psalm here commences. There is a transition from language of the deepest anguish to that of exalted joy and gratitude. The suffering Messiah here contemplates the blessed results of his sufferings.

He tells us, that the end for which he will praise the name of God in the public assembly is to encourage his brethren to do the same.

even the holiest men in the world are never so thoroughly imbued with the fear of God as not to have need of being continually incited to its exercise.

we are taught from these words that the people of God ought to endure their afflictions patiently, however long it shall please the Lord to keep them in a state of distress, that he may at length succour them, and lend them his aid when they are so severely tried.

Thus, although it may not be in our power to cleanse the Church of God, it is our duty to desire her purity.

For they saw in that feast, as in a mirror, the goodness of God set forth to all who are in affliction, which might assuage with wonderful consolation the grief arising from all their calamities.

This passage, beyond all doubt, shows that David stops not at his own person, but that under himself, as a type, he describes the promised Messiah.

Moreover, by uniting them to the fellowship of the holy feast, he manifestly grafts them into the body of the Church.

This passage, I have no doubt, agrees with many other prophecies which represent the throne of God as erected, on which Christ may sit to superintend and govern the world.

A comparison is here made between that remarkable period in which God suddenly became known every where, by the preaching of the gospel, and the ancient dispensation, when he kept the knowledge of himself shut up within the limits of Judea. Christ, we know, penetrated with amazing speed, from the east to the west, like the lightning’s flash, in order to bring into the Church the Gentiles from all parts of the world.

those who seem already to be reduced to dust, and whose restoration from death to life is, as it were, despaired of, shall be partakers of the same grace with him.

They shall come, and shall declare his righteousness, because God shall have given proof, or demonstration, of his righteousness—shall have afforded evidence by the effect, or the deed itself, that he is the faithful guardian of his own people.[1]


[1] John Calvin and James Anderson, Commentary on the Book of Psalms, vol. 1 (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2010), 390.